Energy Performance Certificates have been introduced to help the Energy Efficiency of a building, from 1st October 2008 when a building is constructed, sold or rented an EPC is required.  Of course we all want our properties to be as efficient as possible. By April 2018, it will be illegal to rent out a property with an F or a G Energy Performance Certificate rating.

Two years after that in 2020, the minimum requirement of an E or above rated property will apply to both new and existing lets and by 2025 all rental properties will have to have a rating of D or above.

By 2030, the government have set the target that all rental properties have to be at least a C energy efficiency rating.

You can search the EPC register here: https://www.epcregister.com/

Order an EPC for your property here. 

Energy Performance

An EPC provides a summary of the Energy Performance Certificates of the property in relation to construction, heating and hot water. An EPC for both commercial and residential property is based on a visual inspection and carried out by accredited inspectors. An EPC is always accompanied by a recommendation report with a list of cost effective measures to improve the Energy rating of your building. An EPC will be valid for 10 years, produced using standard methods and assumptions about Energy use so that the Energy efficiency of a building can be compared to another of the same type.

As from 4th January 2010, all commercial and residential properties must have an EPC if they are to remain on the market. Fines imposed will range up to 12.5% of the rateable value of the building, plus further charges up to £5000.

Ethical and Moral Issues

The need for an EPC has been brought about by legislation introduced by the Government in an attempt to slow down global warming. Housing equates to 29% of Energy use in the UK, which is more than the combined total of transport, including cars, planes and trains. Commercial building us is approximately 19%.

Ahead of new regulations, 73% of landlords and tenants are not aware of their property’s EPC rating

    73% of landlords/tenants are not aware of their property’s EPC rating 65% aren’t aware that improving their rating could save them money 95% have not measured their EPC rating New research has emerged revealing a number of staggering misconceptions around how Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) ratings can impact a property’s environmental footprint and save a landlord or tenant money. Book your EPC here The poll, commissioned by insurance agency Just Landlords, was conducted strictly with those involved in the UK private rental market, and found that 48% of those asked did not know that upgrading their insulation would improve their EPC rating.  Of those surveyed, less than two thirds, 58%, knew that the condition of windows had an effect on a property’s EPC rating, and 80% didn’t know an EPC rating could be an indication of how environmentally friendly a house is. 30% did not even know that an...
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Will you be able to rent out your property next year?

  Were you aware that from April 2018, your property will need to be a minimum EPC rating of E or above to be able to rent it to a tenant?  As a landlord, you are liable to pay a hefty fine if you do not adhere to the regulations.This could affect over 300,000 properties in the private rental sector.   Until 2020, it only applies to new lets but after that it will apply to all rented properties. There are rumours that some green deal initiatives will be coming soon, so keep an eye out for those.So, as a landlord what do you need to do now? Have a look at the EPC register to see what grade your property was rated. Click here to go to the register. Make sure it is less than 10 years old. EPC’s are only valid for 10 years, then you need to have...
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All about MEES: a guide to minimum energy efficiency standards

If you are a current landlord or you are considering taking on a buy to let, you’ll need to be aware of the new legal standard for minimum energy efficiency effective from April 2018. The new regulations make it illegal to grant new leases of energy inefficient commercial or domestic properties in England and Wales after 1st April 2018. The regulations do not apply to sales, but if you are considering buying a property to let and the Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) rating is below E, as of 1st April 2018, for new tenancy agreements, you’ll need to meet the required standards before you can rent the property out. This is one of the most fundamental pieces of legislation in recent years affecting the rental potential of UK properties. Under the MEES regulations landlords will face a hefty penalty if they let a property with an F- or G-rated EPC....
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Energy Performance Certificates

Energy Performance Certificates have been introduced to help the Energy Efficiency of a building, from 1st October 2008 when a building is constructed, sold or rented an EPC is required.  Of course we all want our properties to be as efficient as possible. By April 2018, it will be illegal to rent out a property with an F or a G Energy Performance Certificate rating. Two years after that in 2020, the minimum requirement of an E or above rated property will apply to both new and existing lets and by 2025 all rental properties will have to have a rating of D or above. By 2030, the government have set the target that all rental properties have to be at least a C energy efficiency rating. Energy Performance An EPC provides a summary of the Energy Performance Certificates of the property in relation to construction, heating and hot water. An EPC...
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eMoov Petition to Scrap European EPCs in the UK

The Housing Act 2004 made it a mandatory requirement that an energy assessment is made on all properties listed for sale in Britain and later, this applied to rental properties too.  So in 2007 the UK Government introduced EPCs (Energy Performance Certificates). The reason for the introduction was as a consequence of European Union Directive 2002/91/EC  Simply, Britain was told it must adopt a practice of sending inspectors to all homes marketed for sale or to let, before they could be advertised. At an average total annual cost of £100m to the UK home seller and landlord. The resulting energy rating that the certificate assesses is of little help to either buyer or seller and has not proven to reduce energy consumption in any attempt to assist in mitigating the effects on the environment, as was the intention when first conceived by the European Commission.  Founder and CEO of leading hybrid...
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Will changes to EPCs make landlords and tenants more energy conscious?

From 6th April 2012, landlords and letting agents will be required to produce a new Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) for all rental properties in England and Wales to bring the rules for selling and letting a property into line.   From 6th April 2012, landlords and letting agents will be required to produce a new Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) for all rental properties in England and Wales to bring the rules for selling and letting a property into line. The Landlord Syndicate, a network of companies providing a complete and free support centre for landlords, comments on what landlords should consider in light of these changes. The new rules mean that landlords and letting agents must ensure an EPC has been commissioned before they begin to market their property and Trading Standards officials will be given powers to check up whether this has been done. The front page of the EPC...
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CHANGES TO THE EPC RULES!

The government have now announced the following new rules regarding the requirement for Energy Performance Certificates on properties on the market to rent and for sale.  These new rules will be mandatory from the 1st of July. EPC providers have been told and the official memo has been seen by a number of accreditation bodies. However, the memo is headed draft and whilst it refers to July 1 as the implementation date, it is understood that civil servants are still arguing behind the scenes on one of the most important changes: the inclusion of a full EPC on all property details. The EPC will be required within 7 days of commencement of marketing for property marketed after July 1st. Trading Standards Officers are to be given more powers to request proof from agents that the EPC has been ordered and to view the EPC seven days after the marketing has begun....
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